Spirituality vs. Psychosis Perception

If a psychic/medium or spiritual person hears voices they are invited to shows and people reveres them. They are held to such high regards. “Can you please tell me what the voices are telling you about me?”. “Pastor, what is the holy spirit telling you?, “friend, what message has God sent you?”

If someone is diagnosed with psychosis they are seen as “scary, evil, monsters, creepy” although they too hear voices and see things that aren’t there, just like the psychics/mediums or spiritual people.

Why does society accept one but looks down on the other?. Is it because one identifies as spiritual and the other as a medical condition?. Is it because a person with a diagnose may not have full control of their experience?. They both have very similar experiences and yet society values one over the other.

Opinion: Behavioral health services for New Mexico peers FIRST

As an involved mental health peer & who has served advisory and leadership roles
in the New Mexico community for 10 years, I question currently proposed immigration policy and its impact on our peer services.

New Mexico is a “Border State” and a large influx of undocumented immigrants will greatly strain already negligently supported programs in the state. It is reasobable to project this influx will endure funding stretched beyond a social Hooke’s constant and generate longer waiting periods for the limited number of providers in New Mexico.

A typical waiting period for an outpatient behavioral health appointment is three to six months. Our homeless population is underserved with an ever growing population – obviously, housing needs are a HUGE issues for our community. Inpatient stays are revolving doors because inpatient treatment is about immediate stablization and not sustained outpatient success in recovery and wellness.

Why? Funding. Or more specifically, lack of funding. New Mexico doesn’t have a lot of money. Providing every behavioral health service needed for our community takes money. We don’t have enough.

This is an entirely unpopular platform and I’ve been called “heartless”, “racist”, “anti-immigrant”, “white supremicist” (my ancestry makes me one quarter Chinese and one quarter Tahitian – first generation born in America), and a number of other rhetorical barbs designed to shame me for my strong beliefs on social services in New Mexico.

This is an unpopular platform – I openly own this – and I have zero qualms sharing my belief.

With underserved peers and families who are citizens of the United States of America, our citizens’ behavioral health needs must come first. These peers are our priority and our responsibility. When our peers’ behavioral health needs are fully provided, only then should we consider offering services to a significant foreign immigrant population.

We have such a limited amount of funds. I can name a half dozen essential services in Albuquerque who turn away peers because of being underfunded. This is completely wrong.

In an ideal world we could afford to welcome all needful people to benefit from our services. Sadly, doing so would divert services away from our citizens and our peers already underserved. Our peers are our prioirty. This is the reality. Humanitarian support must be offered to our peers at home to ensure all their behavioral health needs are fulfilled.

It’s an unpopular platform and someone has to say it.

Kindly reprinted from Steve’s Thoughtcrimes.

So, Mainstream Media, do you feel fair & balanced, do you feel you’re reporting truth (if not fact), do you hold yourself above perpetrating and perpetuating mental health stigmas? My buddy Mr. Bovee and I are calling “Bullshit!”

The proto-missus and I watched Silver Linings Playbook a few nights back. It was her first viewing, my fifteen billionth. It is a favorite movie of mine for a very single reason:


The character Bradley Cooper plays and the character Jennifer Lawrence plays portray those living with bipolar disorder in a positive light, and showing that for peers recovery and self-discovery go hand in hand.


A major studio motion picture where the central characters are not only folks with mental health diagnoses, they are also not violent and scary and dangerous… check the left armpit of my ex-wife for icicles and her heart for slippery black ice (ha!) because I think Hell just froze over.

“The opinions of the misanthropical rest upon this very partial basis, that they adopt the bad faith of a few as evidence of the worthlessness of all.”

– Christian Nestell Bovee

Reprinted with kind permission of Steve’s Thoughtcrimes.
Originally published October 27, 2017.

Things you really shouldn’t say to someone experiencing the symptoms of major depression

This is another one of those articles I compose that could benefit from some gentle softening, but I’m not going to. This is important, and a feather is not the blunt tool required for a proper illustration.

Here’s the rub. To the Muggle Layperson, the following list of…


Common Things That People Say to Peers Who are Experiencing Major Depression Symptoms


…may seem reasonable, supportive and common sense. To the Peer, these time-honored polished turds are as useful as a magnetic colon in a shrapnel factory in helping us feel any better. No feathers here tonight, ladies and gents!


Here’s the thing about major depression. It’s a disease.


Let me try to explain. People with farsightedness would not choose to have farsightedness. People with leukemia would not choose to have leukemia. People with ulceratic colitis would not choose to have ulceratic colitis. People with major depression would not choose to have major depression. Making any sense? I hope so.

I suppose the guiding principle when reading this list is:


There is a Huge Difference Between “SADNESS” and “DEPRESSION.”


What is this difference? Fair enough. Here’s the difference.


Sadness is a natural reaction that’s the result of something traumatic happening eliciting a real emotional response, such as your favorite cat passing away or Pineapple Fanta being discontinued.
Depression is a result of a malfunctioning organ (The Brain) that only looks like sadness in behavior and is not the same in cause.


Peers, this list will be far too familiar. Muggles, please remember that no one chooses to have major depression. The list will make a lot more sense that way, and it’ll shed some light on why these aren’t the best things to say to someone experiencing major depression, no matter how pure the intent.

I mean, c’mon. Who would choose to have major depression? I’d much rather choose to have a magnetic colon in the shovel & rake aisle of Home Depot.


Just get over it.

Have you tried thinking happy thoughts?

You’re always so negative.

Stop overreacting.

Did you take your meds today?

If you’d get out of bed and do something you’d feel better.

When was the last time you took a shower?

Drama! Drama! Drama!

You aren’t eating enough.

You’re eating too much.

If everyone else can get over their depression, why can’t you?

Do you want to talk about it? You’ll feel better if you talk to someone about it.

You’re strong. You’ll be fine.

Can you try to be normal?

Hey, life sucks. Deal with it.

I sometimes feel you like being depressed.

I know when I’m catching a cold and do something proactive about it. It’s the same for depression. (an executive board member at NAMI Albuquerque shared this bit of wisdom with me when I sat on the board)

Why don’t you just grow up already?

You look horrible!

It’s your choice to be depressed.

Happiness is a choice.

You’re not going to have any friends left if you don’t snap out of it.

I’m sure you’ll feel better after a good night’s sleep.

Are you sure your meds are working right?

Aren’t you sick of listening to yourself?

I give up! You’re impossible to talk to!

Scientology.

You’ve got everything so good, so what do you have to feel sad about?

Look, there are a lot of people who are a lot worse off than you.

What do you have to feel depressed about?

You are what you think. Think you’re happy and you’ll be happy.

It’s all in your head.

Geez, lighten up already!

Aren’t you feel better yet?

Take a really long shower. That always cheers me up.

You need to get out more.

It’s a beautiful day! Why don’t you go out in the sunshine?

Everyone gets depressed sometime.

You should get off those meds. They’re just making it worse.

Scientology.

You’re responsible for your own emotions.

We’ve all got our cross to bear.

Talking to you is pointless because you won’t listen.

Your psychiatrist isn’t doing you any favors.

Stop feeling sorry for yourself.

Big surprise, you’re depressed again. Aren’t you always?

I’m sure you’ll get some good poetry out of all of your suffering.

Get over it!

You want to know why you’re so depressed? Because you only think about yourself.

Have you tried some herbal tea with honey?

What you really need is something truly shitty to happen in your life and then you’ll finally have some perspective.

Just pull yourself together.

Depression is your way of punishing and pushing away everyone who cares about you. (Everyone, I’d like you to meet my ex-wife Susan)

Cheer up!

Thanks a lot, you’re making me feel all depressed now, too!

You are such a buzzkill!

Get out in the fresh air and out of your bedroom.

Happy is as happy does!

Go dancing, go for a walk, go to a concert, go jogging, go to a movie, go to the bookstore, go for a hike, go for a drive, go to the grocery store and buy your favorite food… it’ll make you feel better.

You catch more flies with honey than vinegar. (You catch more flies with the shit you’re spewing out of your mouth than the decomposing body of a beached humpback whale… what’s your point?)

No one said life is fair.

You’re worthless. (Lovingly shared with me by the ex-wife Susan)

You are so selfish.

Can’t you understand I’m just trying to help you?

I’m sure if you wait it out you’ll feel better soon.

Ug, I’ve heard this all before.

Can you focus on something else?

Would you like to listen to someone who whines all the time?

What do you have to worry about?

That is so a non-issue.

Your so-called problems aren’t that big of a deal.

Get a hobby.

Dude, get a grip!

Dude, have a chill pill!

Dude, just get over it!

Dude, it’s not all that bad!

Dude, everyone goes through this!

Dude, you’ll be fine!

Dude, don’t worry so much!

It’s not as bad as you think.

Can you try a little harder?

Can you even remember the last time you were happy?

You’re making it up.

You need a boyfriend.

You need a girlfriend.

Just pull yourself together.

You think you have problems.

Get out and volunteer for something, that way you won’t have time to feel sorry for yourself.

What makes you happy? Do that.

It’s official! You’ll never be able to hold down a job! (Another gem from my lovely ex-wife Susan)

Everyone has a little mental illness.

Shit or get off the pot.

When was the last time you took a vacation?

Tell yourself affirming things about yourself and soon you’ll start believing them.

It’s your own fault you’re depressed.

Scientology.

Depression is how God is punishing you for all your sinning. (I had a pastor tell me this one time… I don’t think I like the God he prays to…)

Here comes the Tickle Monster!

You brought this on yourself.

You have absolutely no reason I can see for feeling this way.

I’m really disappointed. I thought you were stronger than this. (the lovely ex-wife Susan again)

You can do anything you want once you set your mind to it.

Once you start feeling better you’ll see how ridiculous you’re being.

Why should I care? You never listen to me when I’m depressed.

You’ve been taking pills for ages. Aren’t you supposed to be cured by now? (Saint Susan, the ex-wife)

You’re too young to think you have real problems already.

You’re the only one you’re hurting.

It’s always your problems first and everyone else second.

Get off your arse and doing something!

It’s no wonder your girlfriend left you!

Whatever doesn’t kill you makes you stronger! (such a bad bad bad thing to even suggest to someone with depression)

Why don’t you laugh anymore?

Smiling uses less muscles than frowning.

I only loved you when you were successful. (And once more to the Saint Susan barrel of nonsense)

You want to be this way, don’t you?

Everyone has a shitty day every now and then.

Are you sure this isn’t just PMS?

You don’t look depressed to me.

Hey, buck up! It’s not as bad as you think!

Just don’t think about it so much.

Blah blah blah blah blah… cry me a river.

Dear Abby is getting sick of your flood of letters.

You don’t like being depressed? Then change it.

Really? You look fine!

Okay, attention-whore. Just calm down.

Hey, I know exactly what you’re going through. I was really super depressed for about a week after my cat died.

…and the Gold Medal goes to…


Have you tried not being depressed?


Sorry… that’s a knee-jerk reaction to composing this turbulent and trying list over the last hour. Let me share an alternative image that expresses the same sentiment.

Thanks for visiting! Hope you learned a little about the Peer Experience without getting too torqued about the delivery system. And I hope Peers were able to get a chuckle of recognition out of this. You all totally rock out with your socks out!

Reprinted with kind permission from Steve Bringe at Posted on Categories UncategorizedLeave a comment on Things you really shouldn’t say to someone experiencing the symptoms of major depression

Introducing the newest Stand Up To Stigma education program!!!

All of us at Stand Up To Stigma are thrilled to share that we are adding a new education program to our line-up.


I’m Not My Symptoms


We encourage our peer presenters to talk about their mental health symptoms, and talking about our unique symptoms is built in to each of our education programs. However, it is very easy to mistake a peer as the sum total of their symptoms, and this is often the case when we field questions from community audiences or even when we hold presentations and support groups inpatient for other peers.

The misconception that peers are their symptoms is prevalent enough that we’ve chosen to take this stigma on directly. And there it is. Our newest education program. I’m Not My Symptomsfrom SUTS.

We begin training for this new program in January. To be included in the training or for more information, please email info@standuptostigma.org.